Conflicting Norms, Standards and Regulations for Scoring

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Conflicting Norms, Standards and Regulations for Scoring

There is no single set of standards nor a unified code of norms for scoring.

There is no single set of standards nor a unified code of norms for scoring.

That’s resulted in a piecemeal approach to regulating scoring and scoring agencies. Recently, new laws were proposed in Latin America seeking to strengthen privacy law.

For example, last year Argentine President Mauricio Macri submitted a bill to drastically overhaul the country’s data privacy protection law, which hadn’t been updated since 2000. It establishes the right to be forgotten, the right to data portability, and it would limit the scope of scoring by third party companies.

The E.U.’s GDPR regulations restrict what kinds of personal data can be collected and under what circumstances, but even that is enforced differently by local authorities.

In 2019, New York State lawmakers introduced a consumer privacy law that would give consumers more control over their data. It would require businesses—including news and entertainment companies—to demonstrate they are prioritizing customer privacy over profit.

Illinois was one of the first states to enact legislation preventing facial recognition without a consumer’s explicit permission. Individual cities are passing their own data privacy laws, too. Oakland, Seattle, Portland and New York City also approved guidelines on how personal data can be used.

There is no end in sight to scoring regulations, and in the years to come, this kind of data governance will challenge audience insights, risk and compliance, and distribution for entertainment, news and technology companies.