Connected Fabrics

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Connected Fabrics

A process called “reactive vapor deposition” is being used to engineer fabric with smart circuitry embedded into the cloth.

In the past, connected clothing has required wires and sensors, which can make fabrics stiff or uncomfortable.

That’s starting to change, and it will likely lead to more smart clothes for the masses. A process called “reactive vapor deposition,” for instance, is being used to engineer fabric with smart circuitry embedded into the cloth.

Startup Soliyarn is working on imperceptible, flexible sensors woven into self-heating gloves for the U.S. military. Athletic wear is another key market for connected fabrics. Soliyarn is working on smart pajamas and sleep-sensing masks, while others are developing pajamas that can emit infrared energy to help your muscles recover faster from a hard workout.

Pivot Yoga makes connected yoga pants—you read that right—that monitor your downward dogs and help you adjust your form. The connected clothing syncs to an app, through which a digital assistant will tell you when to turn your left hip or to move your legs a few inches back on the mat.

Spire Health makes a fabric-coating that can be attached to bras and underwear to help track your breathing and stress level.